Education

New ways of presenting education in the twenty-first century.

  • Socos: Potentially Mind-Blowing March 3, 2017
    Socos co-founder Dr. Vivienne Ming

    Photograph courtesy of Scott R. Kline, and used with permission.

    Neuroscientist, mom and entrepreneur Dr. Vivienne Ming is using artificial intelligence to change the future.

    Vivienne and her wife, Norma, are the co-founders of Bay Area educational technology startup Socos,   Through Socos, they’re offering an app that helps parents maximize a child’s learning experiences–and life outcome.


    This app, called MuseBot, is based on decades of research and machine learning.   MuseBot will ask a parent a daily question, analyzing a child’s learning process.  Then, the app sends the parent a suggestion for a customized activity.  Activities are designed to spark the child’s interest and imagination, encouraging questions and exploration of his or her world.

    Currently, MuseBot is geared towards children ages newborn to twelve.  But plans are in the works for future products that can intervene at critical points in the learning process for older students, as well.  Vivienne says teen to college-age groups will also be seeing a MuseBot in the future.

    And while MuseBot is a  commercial product, Vivienne, whom Inc. Magazine named one of”10 Women to Watch in Tech” in 2013, also makes it available to low-income customers, through her nonprofit organization.

    Vivienne talked about her background, her experiences co-founding Socos with Norma, who is an educational expert, and the ways MuseBot helps children (and potentially, “big kids”) to maximize learning potential.

    On this edition of Over Coffee®, you’ll hear:
    • Vivienne’s journey towards her current career as a scientist, entrepreneur and educational pioneer;
    • How an undergraduate machine-learning project ultimately inspired her to use AI to improve the educational field;
    • The steps Vivienne and Norma took towards their current work in making a difference in students’ lives and futures;
    • How the Muse software evolved from their experience and research;
    • The philosophy behind MuseBot and the ways it’s revolutionizing education;
    • How parents can apply MuseBot to maximize a child’s learning outcomes;
    • How low-income organizations can use MuseBot–at no charge.
    • A MuseBot intervention Vivienne put to work to awaken her five-year-old daughter’s interest in science;
    • How Socos is developing MuseBot for older children and young adults;
    • What adults can do, today, to maximize their potential–and one of the biggest predictors of future success.

    Share and Enjoy

    • Facebook
    • Twitter
    • Delicious
    • LinkedIn
    • StumbleUpon
    • Add to favorites
    • Email
    • RSS
  • VR: A Medical Direction December 18, 2016
    Over Coffee® is on Christmas hiatus.  We’ll be rebroadcasting some of our most popular episodes from 2016 for the next few weeks.  Have a great holiday!

    What if you had to spend a week in a hospital room?

    And what if your doctor could use virtual reality to help you “escape”–to just about anywhere else?

    That’s exactly what Dr. Brennan Spiegel is currently exploring.

    Dr. Spiegel, who is the  Director of Health Services Research in Academic Affairs and Clinical Transformation at Cedars Sinai, has been conducting studies in which he gives his patients virtual-reality headsets  to “transport” them out of their hospital rooms.   In addition to freeing the patients from what he calls the “biopsychosocial jail cell” that is hospitalization, Dr. Spiegel has had some surprising preliminary findings.

    Could virtual reality actually be more effective than narcotics, in managing pain?

    Nothing is conclusive yet.  However, during his presentation at the IDEAS Los Angeles conference, in June of 2016, Dr. Spiegel told his audience that virtual reality, in his studies so far, appeared to have been more effective than opiates, in pain management!

    Currently, Dr. Spiegel is involved in a larger study of virtual reality and its uses in different hospital environments.   (Here is a link to that study.)

    After the IDEAS conference, Dr. Spiegel explained how he first came to implement the use of virtual reality to help patients “escape” their hospital rooms.  He also discussed his experiences, recent findings, and his vision for virtual-reality therapy in the future.

    On this edition of Over Coffee® you’ll hear:
    • How Dr. Spiegel first became aware of the possibilities of virtual reality in a hospital setting;
    • His experiences with introducing the system to patients on the first day of the experiment;
    • The reasons some patients may not be eligible for a VR study;
    • Positive reactions and responses from some patients who have used therapeutic virtual reality;
    • His plans for a larger upcoming trial among Cedars-Sinai patients;
    • The projected date for results from the larger study;
    • Some of the best experiences Dr. Spiegel has had during the initial study of therapeutic virtual reality;
    • What a patient may experience while wearing the virtual-reality headset;
    • How the brain is functioning during the patient’s use of virtual reality;
    • Dr. Spiegel’s vision for the future, with medical use of virtual or mixed reality.

      (This post is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as medical advice.  Please contact a healthcare professional if you have medical questions.)

    Share and Enjoy

    • Facebook
    • Twitter
    • Delicious
    • LinkedIn
    • StumbleUpon
    • Add to favorites
    • Email
    • RSS
  • Opening Up Innovation December 7, 2016
    Over Coffee® is on Christmas hiatus.  We’ll be rebroadcasting some of our most popular episodes from 2016 for the next few weeks.  Have a great holiday!
    beth-beck-3

    “(Women) really are life hackers,” says Beth Beck.

    Beth, who is the Open Innovation Program Manager in the Office of the Chief Information Officer at NASA, is encouraging them to take those skills to the next level.


    In 2015, Beth came up with the idea of the “Open NASA Data Bootcamp”.  This is a day-long free event, geared specifically to women and newcomers, to take the mystery–and the scary parts–out of coding and problem-solving.

    beth-beck-what-is-code

    Participants get comfortable with these in a STEAM setting: learning to make light-up wearables, for example, or seeing binary code explained visually.   Then, these new skills give them the confidence to participate in  the NASA International Space Apps Challenge hackathon.

    beth-beck-what-is-my-role

    The NASA International Space Apps Challenge is a free, weekend-long event to which everyone is invited.  It’s a “hackathon for good”, during which participants team up to use NASA open data.  Working together,  teams use this data–along with provided technology–to find innovative solutions for global problems.   The Challenge culminates in team presentations, on Sunday, with the winning teams receiving prizes, such as JPL tours or the opportunity to see a space launch.

    beth-beck1

    At the 2016 Women in Data Bootcamp, at Pasadena’s Cross Campus facility, Beth talked about her background, her experiences designing the Data Bootcamp and the ways creativity is shaping the future.

    NASA just announced their 2017 International Space Apps Challenge hackathon dates!   Space Apps 2017 happens Saturday and Sunday, April 29th and 30th.

    Locations can apply to host Space Apps starting December 8, 2016.  Here’s the link to their Facebook page for information.

    In this episode of Over Coffee®, you’ll hear:
    • How Beth’s background nurtured her disruptive-thinking perspective and talents;
    • How the 80-20 ratio of men to women in Space Apps led to the creation of Data Bootcamp;
    • How Beth’s research findings laid the foundations for engaging more women in Space Apps;
    • Some new Space Apps participants’ experiences, after Data Bootcamp;
    • Beth’s recommendations for girls’ education for their future careers;
    • Some resources for new coders, to learn coding;
    • Beth’s observations about the reasons women may hesitate to try something new;
    • The trends she sees for innovators on the cutting edge of something new;
    • How Beth’s current dissertation explores innovation and creativity;
    • Why chaos and a difficult innovative process are okay;
    • How the Data Bootcamp has grown since its start in 2015;
    • Some new Data Bootcamp tools for 2016;
    • AND–a  NASA innovation for “citizen scientists”, announced during 2016 Data Bootcamp!

     

    Share and Enjoy

    • Facebook
    • Twitter
    • Delicious
    • LinkedIn
    • StumbleUpon
    • Add to favorites
    • Email
    • RSS

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
Email
Print